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PR July18 ICHMETThe 19th ICHMET is a continuation of the highly successful conference series that started in 1975 in Toronto, Canada. The 2018 conference will be held at the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education presenting highly diverse content in research areas ranging from the environmental impact of manufactured nanoparticles to the bioavailability of trace elements and radionuclides in the environment, with more than 225 presentations representing over 20 different countries.

Dr. Basta will be presenting the findings of his lead paint treatment research study on ECOBOND® in a session titled: “Bioaccessibility and Extractability of Ecobond® LBP Lead Defender® Treated Lead Based Paint”

James M. Barthel, Creator of ECOBOND® Lead Defender® commented, “We are tremendously honored to have our lead paint treatment solution selected by Dr. Basta and featured in the 2018 ICHMET Conference.”


In June of 2017, ECOBOND® Paint LLC (ECOBOND®) entered into an agreement with Dr. Nicholas Basta from Ohio State University (OSU) a National Leading expert regarding the dangers of lead in the environment. The purpose for this program was to allow for a rigorous independent University validation of the positive effects of ECOBOND® Lead Defender® (ELD) on lead dust and lead paint hazards found commonly throughout the USA and especially in high Urban population centers. Recently the World Health Organization (WHO) reported: “The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) has estimated that, based on 2015 data, lead exposure accounted for 494,550 deaths and loss of 9.3 million Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) due to long-term effects on health.”

Dr. Nicholas Basta is a Professor of Soil and Environmental Chemistry at OSU. He is author of over 422 career publications; 111 of them in the last five years. He is on the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council and the USDA CSREES Technical Committee. Internationally, he is also part of the Bioavailability Research Group of Europe, the Bioavailability Research Group of Canada, as well as on the International Committee for the International Conference on Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements.

Dr. Basta’s research program is focused on risk-based in-situ remediation of metal contaminated sites and development / application of lab methods to evaluate the ability of soil treatments to reduce exposure (bioavailability, mobility) (for the last 20y). The research program is internationally known for its development and application of inexpensive in vitro gastrointestinal methods that are acceptable to USEPA for evaluating bioavailability (human and eco) in contaminated soil.

Dr. Bastia’s ECOBOND® testing included following EPA test methods for:

  • IVBA – In Vitro bio accessibility. This test is to simulate human ingestion
  • TCLP - Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. This test is to test for hazardous material
  • SPLP -Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure. This test is to simulate affects from acid rain
  • WEXT – a de-ionized water extraction test (WEXT). This test is to test for effects of water

Conclusion: ECOBOND® Lead Defender® is a highly efficient, cost effective product for significantly reducing lead hazards through treatment as a primer, sealer or topcoat of a leave on application or waste disposal solution. The results of Dr. Bastia’s independent analysis are consistent with other independent studies and with results obtained daily from the over 10,000 customers who purchase and use ECOBOND® on a wide variety of uses everyday across the USA.

Barthel continued, “ECOBOND® is the premier provider of environmental products focused on protecting human health from the dangers of lead and receiving the results from this research study from Ohio State University, validates the effectiveness of our patented a Lead Contaminated Surface Treatment (LCST), ECOBOND® Lead Defender®. This treatment effectively treats, and seals lead contaminated surfaces; thereby mitigating the potential for lead exposure hazards to humans and the environment. The challenge we faced when researching this solution was that a Lead Contaminated Surface Treatment (LCST) must seal lead contamination on surfaces as well as facilitate treatment of the underlying lead.”

ECOBOND® Lead Defender® is that solution. It is a patented technology that integrates a proven state-of-the-art lead complexing treatment to help RRP contractors as well as homeowners needing a proven and reliable lead dust and paint solution.

The formula contains patented lead treatment reagents, paint penetrators and softeners designed to penetrate, bond, seal and treat existing lead dust and paint while controlling the spread of airborne lead. This product is resistant to acid rain leaching, has low odor, low VOC, a quick dry resin, has excellent adhesion, a low fire hazard due to its high flame resistant and paint qualities like a high end premium latex paint. It is also mold and mildew resistant and can be tinted in a wide range of colors.

To download the full research report with data, titled: “Bio accessibility and Extractability of Treated Lead Based Paint”, visit http://ecobondlbp.com/studies

About ECOBOND®

ECOBOND® Paint LLC is the nation’s leader in developing and distributing products that improve the protection of human health and safety from the hazards of lead in the home, workplace, and the environment. With over 15 years in patented and proven success, the ECOBOND® family of products have been extensively used in successfully treating lead hazards in over 11,000,000 tons of material while serving over 100,000 customers in the United States and Internationally.

The ECOBOND® family of products now includes Bitrex® a bitter-tasting additive to discourage oral contact! This creates an added safety barrier to further protect children from lead poisoning by reducing the amount of paint chips or dust a child may ingest. Bitrex® is the bitterest substance known and is added to ECOBOND® to reduce accidental ingestion of potentially harmful materials.

 

 

 

Contractor landing page2The removal of old paint can be a hassle, especially when extra caution must be exercised due to the content of lead in most of the paints before 1978; but when the structure that you're performing lead paint removal from happens to be of significant height (such as a water, transmission, or industrial tower), there are a few more considerations to be had. 

 

Preparation and Containment

Before starting the paint removal process, every effort should be taken to protect the surrounding areas from LBP (lead-based paint) particles; this includes the soil. The Governmental Department of Health recommends laying a double layer of 6-mil plastic sheeting beneath work areas to keep contaminants from leaking into or settling on the ground. Consider the height of the structure to help you determine the extent of ground coverage needed; airborne particles should be minimized as much as possible during the removal process, but falling debris is inevitable.

Remove, or thoroughly cover any items near the work area that may lead to oral lead exposure, such as picnic tables where people touch potentially contaminated surfaces and then eat; and make sure that all your coverings are secure enough to withstand any gusts of wind.  

Removal

One of the ways to remove old paint is by dry abrasive blasting, but when lead is involved (especially at a high altitude), this is not recommended. Dry abrasive blasting, grinding and extensive dry scraping and dry sanding is very dangerous, and is even prohibited in some instances because of the dust it creates. Lead-based paint particulate has the potential to drift through the air and be inhaled by workers or other passers-by. When the worksite is near residential zones, schools, or other high-traffic areas, it is all the more important to use a method that produces the least amount of dust possible; this is primarily for the safety of all involved (lead poisoning can cause brain, nerve, and digestive damage), and also for your legal protection. The EPA has been handing out some hefty fines for careless removal of lead paint as recently reported by the EPA about the HGTV show with Magnolia Homes for Alleged Lead Paint Violations During Renovations Depicted on the Fixer Upper Television Show

Although wet blasting methods and gel strippers minimize dust, it creates a lot of debris that is difficult to clean up and dispose of without contaminating the worksite. Liquids can easily seep into the soil and poison water sources despite attempts to protect the area.

Disposal

The final collection of waste and debris must be done in compliance with federal, state, and local laws; and a state certified lead-based paint risk assessor or inspector may need to come inspect the work area to ensure that the soil and nearby water sources have not been negatively affected. The best decision is to make yourself aware of the local regulations before starting the project so that you can conduct the work safely and effectively.

The EPA offers a program (RRP) for those who wish to be officially certified in lead paint removal.

Considering the above-mentioned potential adverse effects, companies dealing with lead paint on high structures should always remain within the OSHA standard (29 CFR 1926.62) which states that the allowed exposure limit is fifty micrograms per cubic meter of air measured as an eight-hour weighted average. The management must also ensure that the workers are using protective gear when there is any possibility that the work may involve exposure to lead dust.

ECOBOND® Paint LLC is the Premier Provider of Environmental Products focused on protecting human health from the dangers of lead. Enjoy Peace of Mind from the Dangers of Lead Paint When You Use Our Proven & Patented ECOBOND® Family of Products to Mitigate Lead Dangers to Human Health.

Prior to blasting or scraping, use ECOBOND®. We have a strong emphasis on our TCLP results which is tested using EPA-approved test methods. ECOBOND® - Lead Defender® seals and treats the lead and lead dust in lead-based paint.

 

Lead Poisoning Prevention policies and children

 

Though the 2015 Flint, Michigan water crisis reminded the nation that lead poisoning remains a relevant health concern, evolving lead poisoning prevention policies have helped to significantly reduce childhood exposure to lead and focus on lead paint removal. Here's a brief look at how lead regulations have impacted childhood blood lead levels over time, and what work remains to be done to protect children from lead today. 
 Lead Levels Decline as Lead Regulations Expand:
Significant reforms protecting the public from exposure to lead began in earnest in the 1970s, as widespread cases of childhood lead poisoning prompted action. Several government agencies, including the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) began testing populations for lead exposure, and, with increased understanding, lowering the acceptable blood level limits for lead in both children and adults. New guidelines were enacted to both clean up existing lead in the environment and to prevent future lead contamination. Such policies and regulations include:

  • The Lead-based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act of 1971.
  • The phasing out of leaded gasoline in 1973.
  • The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974.
  • Lead banned from use in plumbing in 1986.

As a result of these policies and other laws and regulations, childhood lead levels drastically decreased over time. By 2010, as a result of additional provisions which further limited the total lead allowable in children's products, the mean blood lead levels for U.S. children, ages 1 to 5, had decreased from a high of around 16% (in the 1970s) to less than 1%. For further information on lead remediation in the U.S., including a chart showing the correlation between lead regulations and mean blood lead levels in children over time, click here.
For the CDC's current guidelines surrounding blood lead levels in children, click here

Addressing Childhood Lead Exposure Today: 

Despite this encouraging progress, elevated lead levels in children is an issue that requires ongoing remediation. In places like Flint, and other locations across the country where corroded water systems, lead paint, and other environmental lead exposures remain, specific populations continue to have unsafe blood lead levels. Although there is still work to be done, there exists a will to deal with the problem of childhood lead exposure in the United States. Regulations surrounding water testing in schools and day care centers have contributed to identifying areas of concern. Further, it is part of the government's Healthy People 2020 initiative to prevent lead exposure to young children by the year 2020. With continued effort, regulation, remediation, and increased awareness, such a goal will go a long way toward protecting future generations from the dangers of lead.  

ECOBOND® Paint LLC is the nation’s leader in developing and distributing products that improve the protection of human health and safety from the hazards of lead in the home, workplace, and the environment. With over 15 years in patented and proven success, the ECOBOND® family of products have been extensively used in successfully treating lead hazards in over 11,000,000 tons of material while serving over 100,000 customers in the United States and Internationally.

The ECOBOND® Paint family of products now includes Bitrex® a bitter-tasting additive to discourage oral contact! This creates an added safety barrier to further protect children from lead poisoning by reducing the amount of paint chips or dust a child may ingest. Bitrex® is the bitterest substance known and is added to ECOBOND® to reduce accidental ingestion of potentially harmful materials.

 

 

 

source: Cision Newswiree

In a recent article from The Southern Illinoisan, it was reported that “two new reports found that HUD didn’t properly oversee inspections or removal of lead-based paint in public housing complexes across the country. While the article comes up against HUD, it needs to also be recognized that for years HUD has been allowing use of new innovative technologies such as ECOBOND® - Lead Defender® which seals and treats the lead and lead dust in lead-based paint and is widely specified by agencies nationwide and has been approved by many government agencies such as DOD, USACE, NOAA, FAA, and Colorado DOT, just to name a few.

The article continued to say that “The audits come as housing authorities in Southern Illinois and New York City face federal accusations of failing to inspect for lead-based paint and to remove it or clean it up where it’s found, while falsely telling HUD they had done so.”

ECOBOND® - Lead Defender® is classified as an Interim Lead Hazard Control which is commonly defined by US EPA/HUD and many state agencies as: “to reduce temporarily human exposure or likely exposure to lead-based paint hazards including specialized cleaning, repairs, maintenance, painting, temporary containment.” [42 USC Chapter 63A – Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction 01/03/2012 (112-90)]

ECOBOND® - Lead Defender®, when applied as directed to interior or exterior structurally sound substrate, qualifies for use during Interim Control by providing lead hazard reduction as part of repair, lead maintenance, lead dust control, and painting as a sealant and primer or interior top coat.

In fact, it was recently reported that ECOBOND® Paint LLC entered into an agreement with Dr. Nicholas Basta from Ohio State University (OSU) a National Leading expert regarding the dangers of lead in the environment. 

James M. Barthel, Creator of ECOBOND® Lead Defender® commented, "We are tremendously honored to have our lead paint treatment solution selected by Dr. Basta. ECOBOND® is the premier provider of environmental products focused on protecting human health from the dangers of lead and receiving the results from this research study from Ohio State University, validates the effectiveness of our patented a Lead Contaminated Surface Treatment (LCST), ECOBOND® Lead Defender®. This treatment effectively treats, and seals lead contaminated surfaces; thereby mitigating the potential for lead exposure hazards to humans and the environment."

Barthel continued, "The challenge we faced when researching this solution was that a Lead Contaminated Surface Treatment (LCST) must seal lead contamination on surfaces as well as facilitate treatment of the underlying lead."

The Lead Defender formula now includes Bitrex® a bitter-tasting additive to discourage oral contact which creates an added safety barrier to further protect children from lead poisoning by reducing the amount of paint chips or dust a child may ingest. Enjoy Peace of Mind from the Dangers of Lead Paint When You Use Our Proven & Patented ECOBOND® Family of Products to Mitigate Lead Dangers to Human Health.

 

 

Breaking News lead paint issues solvedMore than 25 years have passed since Congress passed the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992. How much of an issue is it in 2018? 

Though the Lead-Based Paint Hazard act may seem almost antiquated, it's not. Consider that most states (and many cities) had established departments of public housing in the first half of the 20th Century. The New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), for example, was established in 1935. Today nearly 400,000 NYC residents live in public housing - most of it built well before the US banned the use of lead paint in 1978. And, the ban and lead paint remediation/treatment includes child care facilities and schools, in addition to some other public buildings. 

Lead Paint Ban, Testing, and Treatment

The law, intended to protect families from exposure to lead from paint, dust, and soil, directed HUD and EPA to require the disclosure of known information on lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards before the sale or lease of housing built before 1978.

Contractors and property owners who fail to comply with proper and safe management of lead paint sites are fined and cited. The EPA reported more than 100 federal enforcement actions in 2016. It is much more difficult to track how myriad state and local laws are enforced regarding the removal and/or treatment of residential buildings with lead-based paint. From Maine to Oregon, and from St. Louis to Cleveland, a plethora of laws are enforced at the local, state, and federal level regarding the treatment of lead-based paint hazards - including how residue can contaminate the soil

Download a free lead safety guide to help you in determining your options

Lead Paint Treatment vs. Lead Paint Stripping What's the Difference?

The EPA's 2014 answers to Frequently Asked Questions addresses an important issue - whether removal lead paint is necessary. In fact, stripping (removal) projects often take longer than other treatment options (encapsulation, containment or simply Treating the lead paint) and can increase the potential hazards. This is caused by the process of stripping lead paint, which often results in dust and chips being introduced to the surrounding air, water and soil - effectively adding to the risk of exposure. 

Unfortunately, the answer to the question, "Is lead paint still a hazard in 2018?" is a clear yes. The good news is, since the lead paint ban in 1978, many new and effective treatment options have become available.   

The EPA offers extensive guidance on selecting safe methods of treating any remaining lead paint hazards in public or private housing, schools, and child care facilities, as well as tips on selecting products and certified contractors to handle lead paint treatment projects.

According the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), "Lead abatement is an activity designed to permanently eliminate lead-based paint hazards." There are many laws and regulations regarding lead abatement.  Removal of lead-based paint requires special training, certification, and testing.

Chemical stripping of paint to remove it is considered an abatement technique. This involves application of a stripping agent to loosen the paint, so it can be removed; usually with scraping, blasting with abrasives, or water pressure wash. A huge challenge of this abatement method is proper containment the lead-contaminated waste produced. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) outlines disadvantages to chemically stripping lead-based paint; including the possibility that stripping doesn't guarantee complete removal of the lead threat.  

Lead abatement by paint stripping can be cost prohibitive because of high labor costs and the chemicals themselves are expensive; particularly in the amounts necessary for large projects.

Additionally, the chemicals may:

  • create additional hazards
  • require additional or supplemental Proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
  • require appropriate environmental controls

Operations such as abrasive cleaning of lead-based paint using shots as well as grit that gets hurled at high velocity at lead-based paint create a dangerous amount of lead dust. Shot blasting is necessary because it creates a suitable surface for metallic objects to get painted on. However, the government demands doing a lot of vacuuming and cleaning of the air using scrubbers to prevent the spread of lead-based dust.

Sealing and treating the lead-based paint may be a better solution. Use of paint specifically designed to both seal and treat the lead may be an easier, more economical way to overcome your lead problem and create a safe environment for workers.

Lead treatment involves compounds which react with lead molecules to stabilize them. (A molecule is the tiniest amount of a substance that still has the properties of that substance. A molecule of lead is invisible but still toxic!) This stabilization prevents lead molecules from becoming airborne and creating lead dust contamination. Painting over lead paint with a lead-specific treatment is considered an effective interim control by the EPA that

  • reduces lead hazard temporarily until full compliance can be achieved.
  • works to stabilize lead on surfaces that are slated for disposal.
  • can be used to address immediate lead paint problems such as chipping and peeling.

Additionally, treating lead is far more economical and requires significantly less environmental control than a stripping operation. Prior to blasting in your containment system why not treat it with ECOBOND® - Lead Defender®? This solution provides worker and vicinity residential safety, reduces airborne lead dust particulates, and at the same time seals lead and lead paint dust rendering it non-hazardous for disposal.

Lead Paint Treatment: Eliminating the Hazard of Lead Understand the threat!

Large applications of lead-based paint can leave you with an industrial nightmare unless you know how to treat the problem. The Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA) cites several ways to reduce lead exposure in the workplace. These measures, known as "engineering controls", include ventilation measures, excluding workers from lead-contaminated areas, use of water to contain dust, and replacement with non-hazardous materials. 

Just remember: It is paramount to maintain compliance with all federal, state, and local laws and regulations as you eliminate lead hazards.

Solution:

Enjoy Peace of Mind from the Dangers of Lead Paint When You Use Our Proven & Patented

ECOBOND® Family of Products! Now includes Bitrex® a bitter-tasting additive to discourage oral contact! In the new Lead Defender formula, Bitrex® creates an added safety barrier to further protect children (and pets!) from lead poisoning by reducing the amount of paint chips or dust a child may ingest.

Bitrex® is the bitterest substance known and is added to ECOBOND® to reduce accidental ingestion of potentially harmful materials.

Learn how ECOBOND® - Lead Defender® is a Lead-Based Paint Treatment.
Download free Industry Report: www.LeadPaintTreatment.com